Here’s where your $15 wage went

Go ahead! Go ahead, press for that high paying job. Stick around, you can meet your replacement.

Self-serve kiosks to replace food staff at SUNY Orange

SUNY Orange’s cafeteria workers will be laid off at the end of the spring semester, to be replaced by food-dispensing machines.

In an email sent to students on Thursday, Vinnie Cazzetta, executive director of the nonprofit Orange County Community College Association, which runs the cafeterias, said the change comes after the college’s food-service operations showed a deficit of more than $150,000 last year, “continuing a trend of significant operations losses that has existed for years.”

Cazzetta said nine full-time workers and three part-timers will be laid off as part of the plan.

An outside audit done in December showed larger financial problems were looming, Cazzetta said.

“By doing nothing we could have been out of business in 12 to 18 months. We would not have been able to make payroll,” Cazzetta said.

The College Association is a nonprofit that provides auxiliary services to SUNY Orange. It has existed since the late 1950s and runs the campus book store, food services and buys and manages real estate for future campus development. The changes will go into effect in June. [snip]

Rebecca Walker, a 19-year-old student from Otisville, said while food on campus was pricier than she liked, she enjoyed freshly made, warm food. She said she had no way of eating off campus once she arrived.

“It’s accommodating, it’s convenient and the people who work there are lovely,” Walker said. “It’s kind of awful to lose your job to a machine.”

In recent months, the College Association’s board sought proposals from providers that could handle oversight of food services with the intent of keeping the traditional cafeteria setup that’s been around for decades, Cazzetta said.

“But even with a change of management and anticipated increases of nearly 30 percent in sales, those independent, outside firms projected that losses would have remained in excess of $80,000 annually,” Cazzetta said.

The College Association is close to signing a contract with a new vendor for the self-serve kiosks, Cazzetta said.

Cazzetta said for years food service had been a losing proposition and had been underwritten by revenue from book sales. But in recent years revenue from book sales had been undercut by entities like Barns & Noble, Amazon and eBay. Tax forms representing the 2014-15 school year, the most recent available, show food service was in the red by $150,297 while the bookstore netted $186,595. [snip]

Nichole McClary, who began working in the Rowley Center five months ago for about $12 an hour, said she loved the job. Looking for a new job will change her plans to spend time with her 2-year-old, she said.

“I was looking forward to having the summer off,” she said.

Now you will have the summer off.

All these students wailing about the staff not having jobs fail to look the wages paid. $12/hr for what? That type of work in entry level worth at most $9/hr. Pay $12 to $15 and soon you’re talking to the robot.

Try talking some course in math and economics, hell evcn a course in Home Ec would give some of you lame brains a smattering of how to cost out a home business.

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Quelle difference

Certainment, la difference, c’est vrai.

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You didn’t hear this from the Fake News Media

Not a peep from them. Doesn’t fit the narrative of Trump’s anti-Muslim agenda rant they have on the front burner. However Trump doesn’t have anything of this nature being suggested or mentioned ever.

Migrants are being sold at

open slave markets in Libya

Vulnerable refugees from West Africa often arrive in the country with no money and no papers.

Migrants from West Africa are being openly traded in “public slave markets” across Libya.
As a departure point for refugees trying to get to Europe, migrants arriving in Libya from sub-Saharan are particularly vulnerable due to a lack of money and little in the way of documentation.

Survivors have told the International Organization for Migration (IOM) how there are slave markets and private prisons all over Libya.

Mohammed Abdiker, IOM’s head of operation and emergencies, said: “The situation is dire. The more IOM engages inside Libya, the more we learn that it is a vale of tears for all too many migrants.”

One survivor from Senegal spoke of how he was brought by smugglers across Niger in a bus to the southern Libyan city of Sabha, where he was due to risk a boat trip to Europe. When the middleman did not get his fee, the survivor was put up for sale along with other passengers.

He was taken to a prison where he worked without pay while the captors demanded 300,000 West African francs (about £380) before selling him on to a larger jail. Livia Manante, an IOM officer based in Niger, said migrants would be brought to a square where they were put up for sale.

Manante said: “IOM Italy has confirmed that this story is similar to many stories reported by migrants and collected at landing points in southern Italy, including the slave market reports.”

Those who did not get their ransom paid were often taken away and killed while others would die of hunger and disease in unsanitary conditions.

“If the number of migrants goes down, because of death or someone is ransomed, the kidnappers just go to the market and buy one,” Manente said.

The going rate for a migrant was between $200 (£160) and $500 (£400) each, with many forced into captivity for months before they are freed or sold on. So far this year more than 170 bodies have washed up on the shores of the Mediterranean while the Libyan Coast Guard has also rescued thousands more.

IOM has helped repatriate 1,500 people back to West Africa so far this year where it is trying to inform people not to risk the journey to Libya where they face exploitation.

“Migrants who go to Libya while trying to get to Europe, have no idea of the torture archipelago that awaits them just over the border,” said Leonard Doyle, chief IOM spokesman in Geneva. “There they become commodities to be bought, sold and discarded when they have no more value.”

This article was first published on April 11, 2017

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