Parsing in Vermont, the Proggy way

One might ask Governor Scott just what oath he took when he was sworn into office. It seems to us here at Loon Watch, that oaths taken by public officials usually contain such words as uphold the law, follow the Constitution and other niceties like not breach the public trust and not commit misdemeanors.

We haven’t found any wording allowing for upholding only those laws found in favor. Strange that the people writing the Constitutions both State(s) and US didn’t put in that wording. Guess they weren’t Progressives.

From Vermont Watchdog:

Speaking at a press conference Thursday, Republican Gov. Phil Scott said he would consider deporting some criminal aliens residing in Vermont illegally.

The statement represents a modest change in the governor’s approach to illegal immigration, which has been at odds with the Trump administration’s policy and executive orders.

 HERE is the full posting from:

More excerpts from the article follow:

On March 28, Scott signed into law S.79 , a bill crafted to shield illegal immigrants from “compulsory collection of personally identifying information, or dissemination of that information for purposes of establishing a mandatory federal registry or database.”

Immigration experts have told Watchdog that concealing data about illegal immigrants could cause Vermont to lose federal dollars it receives to support a variety of programs, including law enforcement. [snip]

Vermont Watchdog has reported that among the characteristics the state wants hidden from federal immigration enforcement officers are immigration status, national origin, religion, race and color. But, following Scott’s statement on Thursday, it is uncertain how deportation in Vermont can occur without some state officials revealing the status of criminal immigrants in contradiction to the spirit of S.79.

Sunday Toon

Observations

Given that the EPA wants to control just about every aspect of your life, We here at Vermont Loon Watch believe they should have the best tools available at the lowest cost to the American taxpayer.
For water test kits, each field water sampling engineer needs to be supplied with the finest assortment of Flavor Straws.

Let them slurp and suck the pond and river waters to their hearts content and arriving back at the lab, they can give a first hand report on water quality. If necessary, an emesis bag for sample collecting can be made part of the kit.
Since all these individuals claim to be scientists, we doubt it necessary to remind them to keep their shot records up to date; Typhus, Typhoid, Cholera are important. Amoebic dysentery giardia, a variety of parasitic worms and some more of the rarer types should be noted as possible infections. There are prophylactics for most of these, be aware and be safe. We don’t want anything to happen to our EPA staffers.

All new employees of the EPA shall be required to start their EPA careers in the water quality section. After five years of genuine field work, they will advance to standing and occasional water (non-navigational) such as found in lawns and driveways.
With all this experience, they should be expert at identifying such bodies of wetness tat even waterfowl eschew.

Go get’em Social Justice Warriors!

Keep Vermont Green: Bring Money

Vermont can’t win for losing. Every choice they make adds to a reason not to visit the state.

Read the whore article HERE from:

 

Vermont Senate Finance Committee approves $2 overnight occupancy fee

The Vermont Senate Finance Committee on Thursday approved a $2 overnight occupancy fee, defying Republican Gov. Phil Scott’s request for no new taxes and fees this year.

In the final hours leading up to the Vermont House’s pending vote on a contested state budget plan, the Senate Committee on Finance just upped the political ante.

Committee members, led by Chairwoman Sen. Ann Cummings, D-Washington, voted 5-1-1 to raise $7.2 million from a $2 per-night occupancy fee on lodging. The fee is being proposed to help narrow what began as a $72 million dollar budget gap.

The vote came as the governor has been wrangling with House members over his repeated requests for no new taxes and fees.

“Vermonters would share the actual burden of this tax increase as it will impact the cost of weddings, special events, overnight stays, and more,” Scott said Friday in a statement.

Vermont’s family-owned inns, according to Scott, are fighting to keep their doors open, especially as inexpensive Airbnb options are on the rise in resort areas such as Stowe and Killington. They also face pressure from the Green Mountain State’s variable weather and a business-unfriendly permitting process.

“This tax will unnecessarily increase the cost of hotel and motel stays, straining our tourism sector, which contributes $2.5 billion to our economy annually,” Scott said. [snip]

Rob Roper, president of the Ethan Allen Institute, a free-market think tank, blasted the Senate Finance Committee vote. “It’s colossally stupid. How about a tax on maple syrup next?” he said.

Scott suggested that Senate leaders were playing politics since committee members added the $2 fee requirement to two Senate bills (S.99 and S.100) promoting affordable housing and development projects crafted to grow the state economy.

“This legislation had tripartisan support, with broad recognition of the need to make housing more affordable across the entire housing continuum,” Scott said.

Rebecca Kelley, the governor’s spokeswoman, also criticized the move, reiterating that “Gov. Scott has made absolutely clear he will not support new taxes and fees that make Vermont less affordable.”Rob Roper, president of the Ethan Allen Institute, a free-market think tank, blasted the Senate Finance Committee vote. “It’s colossally stupid. How about a tax on maple syrup next?” he said.

Scott suggested that Senate leaders were playing politics since committee members added the $2 fee requirement to two Senate bills (S.99 and S.100) promoting affordable housing and development projects crafted to grow the state economy.

“This legislation had tripartisan support, with broad recognition of the need to make housing more affordable across the entire housing continuum,” Scott said.

Rebecca Kelley, the governor’s spokeswoman, also criticized the move, reiterating that “Gov. Scott has made absolutely clear he will not support new taxes and fees that make Vermont less affordable.”

In Vermont, a room costing $165/night has the additional 9% R&M tax of $14.85 now and if the Legislature has it’s way one will pay an additional $2 more per night. Now the night’s stay costs $181.85. That’s not counting what it costs to get to Vermont, travel around an eat while there. Why go, when there are less expensive places and you don’t have to support a Proggy anti-American belief system.

An epidemic of stupidity

Stupidity cannot be cured with money, or through education, or by legislation. Stupidity is not a sin, the victim can’t help being stupid. But stupidity is the only universal capital crime; the sentence is death, there is no appeal, and execution is carried out automatically and without pity.

~ Robert A. Heinlein

Opioid Deaths: Another Drug War Failure

Illicit drug use is an old phenomenon, and Jeff Sessions has an old solution: take off the gloves. “We have too much of a tolerance for drug use,” the attorney general complained to an audience of law enforcement officials Wednesday, promising more aggressive policing. “Our nation needs to say clearly once again that using drugs is bad,” he declared. “It will destroy your life.”

That claim will fall on a lot of deaf ears among the 100 million Americans who have used marijuana — most of whom found it did not destroy their lives and some of whom found it made their lives better.

He is right, though, that tolerance is rampant. A Gallup Poll last year showed that 60 percent of Americans think pot should be legalized for recreational use — as eight states and the District of Columbia have done. Medical marijuana is allowed in 28 states and D.C. But in his prepared remarks, Sessions insisted cannabis is “only slightly less awful” than heroin. [snip]

What we are dealing with is the liberal idea that whatever one wants to do is fine, it’s your body and society has nothing to say about it. That’s an idiotic idea; toss a stone into a pond and those ripples impinge upon everything in and bordering the pond.

People often use opioids to relieve pain. But “individuals with chronic pain and their medical providers may be opting to treat pain entirely or in part with medical marijuana, in states where this is legal,” said Johns Hopkins University professor Colleen Barry, the lead author. Sessions made a point of commenting on this unwelcome scientific data: “Give me a break.”

He paid lip service to “treatment and prevention,” but don’t expect much there. The Affordable Care Act, which the Trump administration and congressional Republicans have vowed to repeal, has been “the largest expansion of drug treatment in U.S. history,” according to Stanford University psychiatry professor Keith Humphreys. If they have their way, we can expect the largest contraction of drug treatment in U.S. history.

Promoting treatment goes against the approach long preferred by hard-line politicians. The most effective remedy for opioid addiction is medication-assisted treatment, or MAT, with drugs like methadone and buprenorphine. But if you’d like to stop shooting heroin, you may search in vain for help. [snip]

Zealous drug warriors bridle at anything except prohibition and abstinence. Closing down “pill mills,” where physicians allegedly over-prescribe opioids, is a favorite option. Such lifesaving measures as facilitating access to sterile syringes and naloxone, which is used to reverse overdoses before they kill, are inherently suspect.

The criminalization of opioid use often has fatal consequences, because it leaves addicts to obtain supplies from street dealers rather than pharmacists. The drugs they get may be surreptitiously laced with fentanyl or other synthetic opioids that are cheaper than prescription meds but much more potent — raising the overdose risk.

Crackdowns have other unhealthy side effects. “When the police shut down a local pill mill, they rarely identify the users and help them get treatment, and heroin and fentanyl dealers are quick to move in to exploit the new business opportunity,” writes New York University professor Mark A.R. Kleiman in the March/April issue of Foreign Affairs. “In 2014, deaths from overdosing on prescription opioids fell, but deaths from fentanyl overdoses almost doubled.” [snip]

If these bungholes want help getting off their jones, let them go back to the person that stuck the gun in their ear and said “TAKE THE DRUGS! STICK THAT SPIKE IN YOUR ARM! They’re the ones to ask for succor.

Frankly, I don’t care if you die. You’re not doing society anything worth a damn.

As for the rope smokers, if you can’t live except by altering your reality, excellent. Stay in your basement, get rid of your driver’s license and smoke your self to death.

Those of you that believe smoking the dope doesn’t impair you, Colorado traffic accidents and fatalities say otherwise. Since becoming legal, the number of traffic accidents involving potheads have gone up markedly, and death involving dope have increased too. In fact, Colorado has considered repealing the dope law.

Remember, a police state is a safe state


Why not just have the police hold court right there at the scene and save all the costs of judges, juries and not bother with the Bill of Rights. All the great Progressive regimes of the last century worked that way. Th USSR, The Third Reich, China and now Venezuela. Good company Vermont.

This entire article is HERE.

Vermont gun confiscation bill heads to House floor

A bill that would allow police to remove guns from a domestic violence situation without due process passed out of committee and is headed to the House floor.

On Wednesday, lawmakers of the House Judiciary Committee approved H. 422 by a 7-4 party-line vote, with seven Democrats voting in favor and four Republicans voting against.

Chris Bradley, president of the Vermont Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs, says the bill could face numerous constitutional challenges.

“I am especially concerned about the Second Amendment Article 16 rights of the victim,” he said.

If police are allowed to remove weapons from the scene of a domestic dispute, Bradley says, that could inadvertently leave the victim defenseless.

“From personal experience, I can tell you, you cannot remove all weapons, and you will leave the vulnerable with no means of self-defense,” domestic violence survivor Estella Leach wrote as part of her written testimony to the committee. “A restraining order is meaningless against someone who is intent on retribution.”

Bradley added that the bill could also be challenged on other grounds, including Fourth Amendment protection against illegal search and seizure. The bill has seen numerous changes regarding the weapons an officer can confiscate during a domestic violence situation.

“They moved away from trying to define ‘weapons’ and finally just threw in the towel and said, ‘Well let’s just use “firearms” ’ because that’s what they were after all along,” Bradley said. [snip]

Supporters’ responses
Committee Vice Chair Rep. Charles Conquest, D-Wells River, said that the bill has been “revised in a way as narrow as we can” to maintain its constitutionality while ensuring a victim’s safety. [snip]

While some studies make a correlation between high rates of gun ownership and homicides against women, gun rights advocates note that statistics for Vermont published by the Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence conflict with statistics from the FBI and the Vermont Crime Information Center.

The conflicting data may be owed to the fact that the Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence counts suicides as domestic violence homicides, even in cases where domestic violence was reported many years prior to the suicide.

State Rep. Maxine Grad, D-Moretown, the chair of the House Judiciary Committee and main sponsor of H.422, expressed satisfaction with the committee’s work.

“This is a very necessary ability for law enforcement that does not currently exist,” she said. [snip]

Vermont has what is called a “Constitutional Carry” which means no permits or government papers to carry a concealed weapon or carry openly. This is the bane of the Gun Control Crowd. Given the low rate of gun violence in Vermont all of their arguments about unfettered guns in the hands of the population fall flat.
From personal experience, I called 9-1-1 and got put on hold. So much for police protection.

Where Tinker Bell lives

There is a place in Vermont along Rte 2 somewhere twixt East Montpelier and Marshfield, where the road gets a bit wider and the semis can blow the road detritus and the village idiot off to the side of the byway. Then the Winooski floods sending the village trash down river to Montpelier. The idiot always returns to vote on Town Meeting Day.
He did again; here’s the proof.

Here’s the story at

Small town of Plainfield adopts sanctuary status for illegal aliens

The rural community of Plainfield on Tuesday joined an increasing number of Vermont jurisdictions considered to be “sanctuary communities” for illegal aliens.

The change was adopted in a non-binding resolution put before voters on Town Meeting Day. The resolution passed by a 67-13 vote.

Andy Robinson, a local immigrant rights activist, led the effort by helping gather about 70 signatures to get the issue on the ballot.

“The goal here is to make sure Plainfield is perceived as a town that is considered welcoming and that immigrants here can feel safe,” Robinson told Watchdog. [snip]

The population of Plainfield is roughly 17,000± several cows that were erroneously counted in the last census. Robinson managed to get 70 of them to sign his paper extolling the value of them to the village.
One has to believe Robinson envisions hordes of tourists flocking to downtown to see the locals in native garb. What else they’re going to do is open to question for Plainfield’s manufacturing base is bereft of large openings.
Of course, many hands on many teats and that can eliminate the automated milking parlors, bringing back the Vermont of the ’40’s.

James Simpson, a former analyst for the White House Office of Management and Budget who now focuses on immigration, the Plainfield resolution is little more than words on paper, but nonetheless sends a message.

“It doesn’t matter if it’s just a meaningless resolution or something that becomes an ordinance,” he said. “It all sends the same message, and that is that the official position on illegal aliens is that they are welcome here.”

Simpson says while most illegal immigrants are seeking a better life, the population as a whole is disproportionately more likely to be involved in crimes. As reported by Breitbart, U.S. Sentencing Commission data for fiscal year 2014 shows that while illegal aliens accounted for 3.5 percent of the U.S. population, they accounted for 36.7 percent of federal sentences following criminal convictions. [snip]

Well, the denizens of Plainfield will be milking unicorns and frolicking with Tinker Bell, all while hoping a tourist or two will wander off Rte 89 or Rte 91 meander up the hills to Danville and then over Rte 2 searching for civilization and pass through the Twilight Zone.